1/03/2017

2017 Library Love Challenge

The goal here is to support our local libraries and I do love libraries, having used them all my life, most especially our State Library system, here in Hawaii.  Hosted by Bea's Book Nook and Angel's Guilty Pleasures, you can  find out more or sign up, by clicking on either of those host links.  Participants will read a minimum of 12 library (audio or print) books in the year.  Pick your own challenge level.  Library Card on Fire: read 50+ books is my challenge selection.   Though, truth be told, not a tough one.  There should be a category, Book Addicted.  I read way more than 50 in any given year.

 However, not keeping any sort of records, my New Year's resolution was to actually write down all the books read. This is one way of doing it, and I'll be adding to the list here.  I do check out a lot, but don't read them all.  If a book doesn't grab me, there's no need to finish, it goes back in the bag for return.  Which is one of the great things about reading library books.  You only need to read what you enjoy, without feeling guilty about wasting money.

Sometimes I post a recipe inspired by the book, or have a little more in depth review, and will add a link, in that event.  So, without further ado, here are my ongoing reads:

January Reading
1.  Angel Landing, by Alice Hoffman.  Not my favorite of her books, but an enjoyable and absorbing read all the same.  Unique, sympathetic characters, though the motivation of Finn, a major protagonist, was unclear.  I kept wanting someone to ask him, "why did you do it?" We were never told, so just assumed it was a radical reaction to his upbringing.

2.  The Girl in the Glass, by Susan Meissner.  A beautiful story, set partially in 16th century Florence with a Medici princess, but mostly in the present with a young woman who has longed all her life to visit Florence, and how one life impacts the other through another woman she meets there.  I loved the converging stories of  three women,  romance found and the realization that we can be what we imagine.  The importance of imagination balanced by reality.  More posted here.

3.  Mrs. Jeffries & the Silent Knight, by Emily Brightwell.  I do enjoy her Victorian mystery series, of which this is #21. Lightweight, English cozies, but usually with a good plots and enjoyable characters.  The Inspector's housekeeper and staff conspire to help solve his cases, without his being aware of their sleuthing.

 4. Turbo Twenty-Three, by Janet Evanovich.  Another of her hysterically funny Stephanie Plum novels.  Plum is an often inept bounty hunter for her cousin Vinnie in Trenton, N.J.  The whole plot, the scrapes she gets into, her sidekicks, family, co-workers, boyfriends, and assorted other characters are so over-the-top, I just laugh my way through the books, and this is no exception.  Love it, though perhaps it needs a rude, crude and sexy warning.  Further review and food here.

5. The Dark Enquiry, by Deanna Raybourn is in her Lady Julia Grey series.  I keep hoping for Lady Julia to be a bit more pro-active and less dependent upon others for rescue.  After all she knows how to shoot, and has now had boxing lessons.  Let's have a little more initiative if you want to be an investigator with your husband.

6.  The Dark Vineyard, by Martin Walker in his Chief of Police Bruno series.  Another terrific mystery with so much added goodness in terms of the food Bruno prepares, and the wines sampled and described.   Complex characters, with a helping of romance.  I especially like that the hero, Bruno, is one I can admire, with his gardening, hunting, cooking, truffle raising and wine appreciation.

7. Not My Blood, by Barbara Cleverly in her mystery series starring Joe Sandilands, a Scotland Yard detective .  These novels are set in the 1930s, sometimes in England, India or France.  In this book Sandilands must get to the bottom of a number of disappearances in an English boys' boarding school.  Eugenics and euthanasia are issues involved here.

8.  The Thirty-Nine Steps, by John Buchan, is a classic mystery of the old English adventurous spy school, taking place just before the outbreak of WWI..  Our hero, unasked and unprepared, finds himself at the heart of international intrigue, trying to stave off a grave threat to Britain and France, whilst fleeing pursuit from London and through the wilds of the Scottish highlands.

The Memory of Blood, by Christopher Fowler, one of my very favorite authors.  Yes I do have favorites.  He is the author of a series of wacky mysteries, featuring The Peculiar Crimes Unit, an off-shoot of MI5, or something like it, in London.  Starring an eccentric lead duo, entertaining cast of characters, and as with this one, a confounding, seemingly impossible case, they need to be read for full appreciation.  Further review with food here.

10.  Stir, My Broken Brain and the Meals That Brought Me Home, by Jessica Fechtor.  This was a truly excellent book.  Good, evocative writing, humor and so many recipes that I'm looking forward to trying.  My complete review is here.

11.  Jane and the Man of the Cloth, by Stephanie Barron, the second in her Jane Austen Mystery series.  It seemed to drag on a bit, bogged down I think by the language and customs of the time, not brought sufficiently to life.  Not really a very satisfying conclusion either.  Why build up a romance with Jane, when the author knows, and we know it won't go anywhere?

12.  Love Story, with Murders, by Harry Bingham was all right as far as murder mysteries go, and I liked that the heroine was able to hold her own and take down criminals using some martial arts skills (would like to see more like her) though a lot of her life was fairly problematic, due to psychological issues, and smoking weed all the time would certainly not help in the real world with overcoming mental problems. Other characters were well done however.

13.  A Fall of Marigolds, by Susan Meissner - I enjoyed this blend of times and the events surrounding two NYC catastrophes, a devastating factory fire in September of 1911 and the World Trade Center attacks in September of 2011, with connections between two women and a beautiful scarf, passed down through them.  Good characterizations and a well-crafted story-line.

February Reading

1.  The Seven Sisters, by Lucinda Riley - a favorite author of mine, her the first of a new series.  This opening novel is the story of six adopted girls, with the main focus here on the eldest, Maia.  All six are named after the stars of the Pleiades, though the seventh is missing, to be revealed eventually we hope.  I enjoyed the settings, in Switzerland and then in Brazil, as Maia discovers her background before adoption, the individual characters and plot.

2.  City of Jasmine, by Deanna Raybourn - another by a favorite author.  I do enjoy her Lady Julia Grey series.  This one is an enjoyable stand alone about a 1920s aviatrix, who after losing her husband on the Lusitania, takes up flying.  A grand travel adventure, set in various colonial outposts, with treasure hunting, romance and a bit of  thrill thrown in.  What more could you ask for?  Well, maybe deep thoughts.

3.  Strangers in Company, by Jane Aiken Hodge - a new author to me, but one who's been around for quite awhile apparently.  It was okay, though I didn't identify much with the heroine.  She seemed to spend most of her time being tired.  Which is tiring to read about.  The plot was a bit implausible as well.

4.  Persuasion, by Jane Austen - which if I had ever read previously, did not remember.  It takes a bit of concentration, getting past the dated language, cultural expectations and expressions, such as "under-hung" :)
But once in the swing of it all, I enjoyed the story, and characters.

2 comments:

Angel's Guilty Pleasures said...

Your link is updated on the Library Love Sign Up page.

Claudia said...

Thanks Angela, probably should delete the other one (#27).